Recent Studio Landscapes

A few studio landscapes from the last six months. Most are enlarged from plein air sketches done over the last couple of years.

bolgheri road Recent Studio Landscapes

The Beach Road at Palone. 90 x 110 cm, oil on linen.

umbria Recent Studio Landscapes

Poggio delle Corti. 90 x 110 cm, oil on linen.

baratti Recent Studio Landscapes

Dawn at Baratti. 70 x 90 cm, oil on linen.

senese Recent Studio Landscapes

Wheat Fields in the Senese. 80 x 100 cm, oil on linen.

la pieve Recent Studio Landscapes

Cemetery at La Pieve. 60 x 80 cm, oil on linen.

volterra Recent Studio Landscapes

Le Balze, Volterra. 90 x 110 cm, oil on linen.

Volterra Sketches

camoldolese Volterra Sketches

Badia Camoldolese #1. 25 x 35 cm, oil on panel.

Here are some of my sketches from our plein air workshop near Volterra. We had good weather for the ten days, even if the wind was problematic at times. I find wind can be harder to work with than rain.

camoldolese21 Volterra Sketches

Badia Camoldolese #2. 30 x 40 cm, oil on panel.

volterra dawn2 Volterra Sketches

The Fortress at Volterra, Dawn. 20 x 30 cm, oil on panel.

volterra midday Volterra Sketches

The Fortress at Volterra, Midday. 20 x 30 cm, oil on panel.

baccelli Volterra Sketches

Fragole e Baccelli. 20 x 30 cm, oil on panel.

poppies Volterra Sketches

Poppies in the Alfalfa. 20 x 30 cm, oil on panel.

emma Volterra Sketches

Emma Studies. 35 x 25 cm, oil on panel.

era2 Volterra Sketches

The Era. 30 x 20 cm, oil on panel.

P1180055 Volterra Sketches

San Giusto #2, Volterra. 25 x 35 cm, oil on panel.

Blaming the Materials

Here are a couple of sketches from my plein air workshop near Volterra. The first I’m happy with, the second is awful.

volterra Blaming the Materials

San Giusto, Volterra. 20 x 30 cm, oil on panel.

P1180057 Blaming the Materials

San Giusto, Volterra. 25 x 35 cm, oil on panel.

The sketch above isn’t my fault. Really. Every month I make dozens of sketches and I usually buy large quantities of the gessoed boards from Zecchi. A few months back I got a batch from them where their subcontractor had messed up the proportions of the gesso and there wasn’t enough glue. The boards are too absorbent and are utterly unusable. Somehow they got mixed up into the next batch of boards I ordered and every now and then I find I’m trying to paint on one. It is impossible for me to pull anything decent off with one of these boards. I’ve had to throw away the ten or so paintings from the times I’ve insisted on trying.

On our workshops we give the students a full painting kit. It makes it easier for those who have to travel, but the reason we do it is really that we got tired of students arriving with unusable materials. Rubens couldn’t paint with some of the set-ups these people arrived with. Often they don’t have the experience to recognize that it’s their materials that are the problem. Since we started giving out full kits, we’ve seen a marked improvement in the students paintings. They are able to focus on learning to paint.

Good quality painting materials don’t have to be expensive either. Here in Florence we find the Zecchi brand is fine for paints (for dark ultramarine we use Old Holland). In the US, Blue Ridge and M. Graham both make excellent paint for reasonable prices. Often ‘student-grade’ paints are so full of fillers that to change one color you have to add a ton of the other one. This means the cost savings is gone when you calculate how much paint you actually have to use.

Good boards are cheap. Ray Mar is a good supplier in the US, Zecchi in Europe (when they get them right), or make your own. I use a cigar-box clipped to a $50 easel for most of my sketches. Brushes are really important but they don’t have to be expensive and will last for years if looked after properly. There is no excuse to skimp on materials if you care about painting.

At the end of the day, painting is hard enough without fighting your materials.